Records roll on China iron ore sales

Original article by Ronald Mizen
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 10 : 23-Jul-21

New figures show that Australia’s iron ore shipments to China rose by $1.1bn to $14.8bn in June, despite the ongoing trade tensions between the two countries. Australia exported some $17.6bn worth of the steel input during June, with China accounting for about 85 per cent of this total. The Australian Bureau of Statistics notes that the iron ore price rose by five per cent during the month. Meanwhile, Australia’s overall exports grew by $2.8bn in June, to $41.2bn; the nation’s goods trade surplus was steady at a record $13.2bn.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

China trade rises to $208bn despite feud

Original article by Patrick Commins
The Australian – Page: 6 : 8-Jan-21

Two-way goods trade between Australia and China hit $208.8 billion over the 11 months to November, according to figures released by the Australian Bureau of Statistics on 7 January. The figure is higher than the comparable period in 2019, despite the increasingly strained relationship between the two countries. Imports from China over the subject period increased by five per cent to $76.3 billion, while Australian exports to China rose to $132.5 billion. The value of iron ore shipments fell by two per cent in November, while LNG sales were up eight per cent.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

Canavan calls for retaliatory levy on iron ore to China

Original article by Ben Packham
The Australian – Page: 6 : 14-Dec-20

Former resources minister Matt Canavan contends that the federal government should respond to China’s import bans and punitive tariffs by imposing a levy on iron ore exports. Australia ships nearly 900 million tonnes of iron ore to China each year, and Canavan argues that a levy of just one per cent would raise more than $800m annually; this could be used to compensate companies that have been hit by China’s trade sanctions. Canavan notes that iron ore has not been affected by the trade war, as China cannot quickly and easily source an alternative supply.

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China not playing by trade pact rules

Original article by Ben Packham, Will Glasgow
The Australian – Page: 4 : 9-Dec-20

Trade Minister Simon Birmingham says the federal government is considering "all dispute settlement options" in response to China’s recent move to ban a range of imports from Australia. He has also suggested that the targeted nature of the import bans raises questions about China’s adherence to the free-trade agreement that the two nations signed in 2015. China has yet to explain why it has banned meat exports from Queensland-based abattoir Meramist, although there is speculation that it is in retaliation to the federal government’s Foreign Relations Bill.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE, MERAMIST PTY LTD

Find another market other than China, exporters warned

Original article by Will Glasgow, Nick Evans
The Australian – Page: 6 : 6-Nov-20

Federal Trade Minister Simon Birmingham has asked the Chinese government to clarify whether it does intend to impose new bans on Australian imports, after media reports in China appeared to confirm this. Meanwhile, federal government officials have discussed the potential ban during a telephone briefing with representatives from the agricultural industry, one of the sectors that would be amongst the hardest hit by such a ban. Participants in the briefing say they were advised to find alternative export markets.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE

China spat puts $149bn trade at risk

Original article by Will Glasgow, Ben Packham
The Australian – Page: 1 & 8 : 5-Nov-20

There is growing concern that the Chinese government is set to impose bans on more Australian imports. Wine producers have become the latest casualty of escalating tensions between the two nations, with Chinese customs officials preventing them from exhibiting at the China International Import Expo. The lobster industry has also been targeted, with a shipment worth more than $2m having to be destroyed after it was delayed at a Chinese airport. Unconfirmed media reports in China have suggested that a widespread ban on Australian imports – including coal, copper and sugar – will take effect on 6 November.

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China to halt key Australian imports in sweeping retaliation

Original article by
Bloomberg – Page: Online : 4-Nov-20

Sources have indicated that Chinese traders have been ordered to cease buying at least seven categories of Australian commodities, amid growing tensions between the two nations. Traders are said to have been verbally told to stop buying Australian coal, barley, copper ore and concentrate, sugar, timber, wine and lobster from 6 November. However, iron ore is not believed to be included in the list of barred commodities at present. Chinese media reports have also suggested that a ban on Australian wheat will also be imposed.

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Australian exports to China fall 26pc, fastest drop among trade partners

Original article by Glenda Korporaal
The Australian – Page: 20 : 8-Sep-20

Data from China’s General Administration of Customs suggests that the value of the nation’s imports of goods from Australia fell by 26.2 per cent year-on-year in August, to $US8.81bn. This follows a 7.2 per cent fall in July. Australia’s overall exports to China have fallen by 7.5 per cent to $US75.7bn over the year, according to the Chinese data. The Australian Bureau of Statistics has previously reported that the nation exported a record $150bn worth of goods to China in the year to 30 June. Australia’s relations with China have become increasingly strained in recent months.

CORPORATES
CHINA. GENERAL ADMINISTRATION OF CUSTOMS, AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

China devours one-third of all our farm exports

Original article by Patrick Commins
The Australian – Page: 5 : 20-Aug-20

Data from Rabobank shows that China accounted for 32 per cent of Australia’s food and agricultural exports in 2019-20. China also bought 30 per cent of Australia’s lamb exports and 25 per cent the nation’s beef exports during the financial year, while it accounted for 77 per cent of wool shipments. Tim Hunt of Rabobank warns that Australia is too reliant on a single export market, particularly given the recent tensions between the two nations. He notes that while China has been the major driver of the agribusiness sector’s growth over the last decade, there is a need to diversify into other export markets.

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RABOBANK AUSTRALIA LIMITED

China knew barley dumping claims were false

Original article by Andrew Taylor, Brad Thompson
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 6 : 20-May-20

The federal government will hold crisis talks with barley growers on 20 May following China’s imposition of a punitive tariff, but Trade Minister Simon Birmingham says the nation will not retaliate with a trade war. The government is likely to take the matter to the World Trade Organisation, although it remains hopeful of resolving the dispute bilaterally. Meanwhile, it has been revealed that the government’s submission to China’s Commerce Ministry noted that China International Chamber of Commerce officials had admitted that there was no evidence to support claims of dumping by Australian barley producers.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE, WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION, CHINA. MINISTRY OF COMMERCE, CHINA INTERNATIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE