Tax cuts key to driving revival: US

Original article by Geoff Chambers
The Australian – Page: 1 & 4 : 10-Oct-19

US Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross will meet with Prime Minister Scott Morrison in Canberra on 10 October. Ross says the federal government should look at corporate tax reform in order to increase the nation’s global competitiveness and attract more direct foreign investment. Ross has also cautioned against focusing too much on Australia’s trade relationship with China at the expense of its investment relationship with the US. He has also warned that Australia’s aluminium exports to the US are under scrutiny following a recent trebling of export volumes after the Trump administration agreed to a tariff exemption.

CORPORATES
UNITED STATES. DEPT OF COMMERCE, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE, UNITED STATES. EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

Tax cuts, not surpluses, key to growth

Original article by Adam Creighton
The Australian – Page: 5 : 24-Sep-19

Returning the Budget to surplus has been a priority for the federal government since it won office in 2013, and it is on track for a surplus in 2019-20 after posting a deficit of less than $700m for 2018-19. However, documents released under Freedom of Information laws show that the Treasury is of the view that tax cuts may be the best way to stimulate the economy. The Treasury papers note that the government’s income tax cuts package will boost household disposable income by 0.75 per cent over three years, while delaying or reversing future tax cuts would reduce the efficiency of the economy and the tax system.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY

Bring global giants to heel on tax

Original article by Olivia Caisley
The Australian – Page: 5 : 1-Aug-19

Labor senator and former union official Tony Sheldon says the federal government should follow the example of other nations and ensure that multinational companies pay their "fair share" of tax in Australia. Sheldon also used his maiden speech in parliament to urge the government to take action to ensure that gig economy workers are entitled to superannuation and a fair rate of pay.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, FACEBOOK INCORPORATED, AMAZON.COM INCORPORATED, UBER TECHNOLOGIES INCORPORATED, GOOGLE INCORPORATED, FOODORA AUSTRALIA PTY LTD, DELIVEROO AUSTRALIA PTY LTD, TRANSPORT WORKERS’ UNION

Lower taxes can lift growth and wages

Original article by Michael Roddan
The Australian – Page: 2 : 17-Jul-19

The University of Melbourne’s John Freebairn argues that reducing the tax rate for larger companies would stimulate economic growth and help to increase wages. He adds that a tax cut for large companies with non-resident shareholders in particular would boost GDP growth. The federal government has ruled out further attempts to introduce tax cuts for businesses with annual turnover of more than $50m following the bill’s rejection by the Senate.

CORPORATES
UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, ECONOMICS SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA

Kelty: cut the top tax rate

Original article by Jennifer Hewett
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 8 : 8-Jul-19

Former ACTU secretary Bill Kelty warns that Australia’s income tax system will remain uncompetitive unless there is broader reform than the federal government’s tax cuts package. Kelty argues that any reforms to the tax system should be in response to the demands of the future, negating Labor’s view that the stage-three tax cuts should have been put on hold due to uncertainty about the economic outlook in five years’ time, when they are slated to take effect. Kelty also says Australia’s top marginal income tax rate is too high, and changes to the enterprise bargaining system are needed.

CORPORATES
ACTU, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, CONSTRUCTION, FORESTRY, MARITIME, MINING AND ENERGY UNION OF AUSTRALIA

Albanese’s team mulls Coalition’s full tax cut agenda

Original article by Richard Ferguson
The Australian – Page: Online : 4-Jun-19

Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese has indicated that Labor would be open to briefly reconvening parliament in June to pass the first stage of the Coalition’s proposed income tax cuts. He adds that Labor will consider the second and third stages on their merits. Labor is unlikely to decide whether to support the full package at its first post-election shadow cabinet meeting on 4 June. Shadow treasurer Jim Chalmers says Labor will review its tax policies in the wake of the election loss, but notes that a range of tax concessions cost a lot of money that could be better used elsewhere.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY

Promised cuts ‘don’t have to wait for parliament’

Original article by Richard Ferguson, Joe Kelly
The Australian – Page: 7 : 22-May-19

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg says the proposed increase in the low and middle-income tax offset will be the Coalition’s top priority when parliament resumes. He has conceded that parliament is unlikely to be reconvened before 30 June to allow the tax cuts to be passed before the start of the new financial year. A spokesman for the Australian Taxation Office has advised that the changes to the tax offset can be applied retrospectively if the legislation is passed after 1 July.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN TAXATION OFFICE, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY

Income tax cuts, bigger surpluses

Original article by Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 10 : 10-May-19

Labor will release the Parliamentary Budget Office’s costings of its election policies on 10 May. The costings show that Labor is projected to deliver a Budget surplus equivalent to one per cent of GDP in 2022-23. In contrast, the Coalition expects to post a surplus in 2022-23 that is just 0.4 per cent of GDP. Meanwhile, Labor’s proposed tax reforms are slated to raise $154bn over 10 years. The costings also show that a Labor government would deliver total tax cuts over the next decade that are similar to those that have been budgeted by the Coalition.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY BUDGET OFFICE, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY

Morrison: Business tax cuts are no-go

Original article by Tom McIlroy, Andrew Tillett
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 12 : 10-May-19

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has refuted suggestions that the Coalition will seek to revive its corporate tax cuts package if wins the election on 18 May. He also says the Coalition did not discuss the issue of company taxes with Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party during negotiations for a preferences deal. Shadow treasurer Chris Bowen recently claimed that company tax cuts will be on the Coalition’s agenda if it is returned to office.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, UNITED AUSTRALIA PARTY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, ONE NATION PARTY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA

Morrison and Shorten, take note: Trump shows what enterprising tax settings can do for jobs

Original article by Robert Gottliebsen
The Australian – Page: 33 : 7-May-19

Between 2019 and 2025, the cumulative tax bill of people earning more than $200,000 a year will be more than $33,000 higher under Labor than the Coalition, according to a tax calculator on Self-Employed Australia’s website. Low-income earners who receive $15,000 worth of franking credits each year would also be worse off under Labor. The tax policies of Australia’s major political parties are in contrast to the personal and company tax cuts of US President Donald Trump. Some 263,000 jobs were created in the US in April and the unemployment rate fell to its lowest level since December 1969, while there has been average hourly earnings growth of 3.2 per cent over the last year.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, SELF-EMPLOYED AUSTRALIA, UNITED STATES. EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT