ALP target a business bodyblow

Original article by Rosie Lewis, Elias Visontay
The Australian – Page: 1 & 4 : 24-Feb-20

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann has criticised Labor’s target of net zero carbon emissions by 2050, describing it as "reckless and irresponsible". Labor leader Anthony Albanese has indicated that the net zero emissions target will be economy-wide, prompting concern among sectors such as agriculture and logistics. Agriculture Minister David Littleproud has warned that achieving this target would require Australia to eliminate most of its cattle herd, which would in turn result in higher costs for consumers.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FINANCE, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF AGRICULTURE AND WATER RESOURCES, NATIONAL FARMERS’ FEDERATION LIMITED

Labor backs net-zero emissions, won’t use Kyoto credits

Original article by Geoff Chambers, Greg Brown
The Australian – Page: 4 : 21-Feb-20

Opposition leader Anthony Albanese will use a speech on 21 February to commit Labor to a target of net zero carbons emissions by 2050. It will replace Labor’s previous target of reducing emissions by 45 per cent by 2030, which was rejected by voters at the May 2019 election. Albanese will also stress that Labor will not use Kyoto carry-over credits or provide any financial support for the construction of coal-fired power stations.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY

Energy split as Lib says zero target too tough

Original article by Greg Brown, Elias Visontay
The Australian – Page: 4 : 11-Feb-20

More than 80 countries have committed to a target of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, and some members of the Liberal Party’s moderate faction believe that Australia should also adopt this target. However, moderate Liberal Jason Falinski doubts that Australia could achieve this target, given that it is a major energy and agriculture exporter. Conservative Liberal senator Eric Abetz also questions the viability of a 2050 zero emissions target. There is also dissension within the Coalition’s ranks with regard to taxpayer funding for new coal-fired power stations.

CORPORATES
LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY

Greens want coal levy to fund more paid firefighters

Original article by Judith Ireland
The Sydney Morning Herald – Page: Online : 6-Feb-20

Greens leader Adam Bandt has proposed the introduction of a levy on coal, gas and oil producers. The levy would be priced at $1 per tonne of carbon dioxide and would raise about $1.5bn a year. Most of the proceeds would be used to hire nearly 16,000 additional paid firefighters in metropolitan and rural areas. Bandt says the nation’s firefighters are exhausted by the intensity and duration of the bushfire season. The Australia Institute also called for a levy on fossil fuel producers in late 2019, as part of its proposal for a National Climate Disaster Fund.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN GREENS, THE AUSTRALIA INSTITUTE LIMITED

Greens call for climate emergency national stockpile

Original article by Nick Bonyhady
The Age – Page: Online : 14-Jan-20

The Greens have called for a climate emergency national medical stockpile to address the health impacts of the current bushfires. The policy would see people in smoke-impacted areas have access to stockpiles of smoke-filtering masks, with Greens leader Richard Di Natale saying that the federal government’s current supply of masks was not enough to protect Australians. The federal government has stated it will make more masks available if the need arises, while Bunnings owner Wesfarmers reported recently that demand for face masks "had gone through the roof".

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN GREENS

Kyoto credits may not be needed

Original article by Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 8 : 18-Dec-19

Energy Minister Angus Taylor says Australia is on track to exceed its 2030 carbon emissions reduction target under the Paris climate agreement. He says the nation has consistently over-delivered with regard to reducing carbon emissions, and he is confident that it will do so with regard to the 2030 target. Matt Harris of Frontier Economics believes that Australia can meet its 2030 target without needing to use Kyoto carry-over credits.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, FRONTIER ECONOMICS PTY LTD, GRATTAN INSTITUTE

Time for Adani to deliver on jobs

Original article by Greg Brown
The Australian – Page: 4 : 12-Dec-19

Labor leader Anthony Albanese says Adani’s Carmichael coal mine has been approved, so the company should begin creating the jobs that it has promised. Adani in turn argues that it already employees hundreds of people. Albanese has also used his tour of regional Queensland to call for labour-hire workers in the mining sector to receive the same pay as direct employees, contending that some are paid up to 40 per cent less. He has also criticised the federal government for its lack of action regarding the low wages of labour-hire workers.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, ADANI MINING PTY LTD, BHP GROUP LIMITED – ASX BHP, MITSUBISHI CORPORATION

Carbon accounting trick a no-go for ALP

Original article by Rosie Lewis
The Australian – Page: 4 : 12-Dec-19

Energy Minister Angus Taylor says the federal government will only use Kyoto carry-over credits to the extent necessary to meet its 2030 carbon emissions reduction targets under the Paris climate agreement. Opposition leader Anthony Albanese has reiterated that Labor will not use the carry-over credits if it wins the next federal election. Meanwhile, a report produced by Climate Analytics on behalf of the Australia Institute has questioned the legality of using carry-over credits.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, CLIMATE ANALYTICS, THE AUSTRALIA INSTITUTE LIMITED

Labor MP pushes industry bargaining to fix IR system

Original article by David Marin-Guzman
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 2 : 10-Dec-19

Labor senator Tim Ayres says Australia’s long period of sustained economic growth has led to complacency with regard to industrial relations. He argues that factors such as low wages growth and the decline in enterprise bargaining means Labor needs to rethink its policy on IR. Ayres adds that Labor should consider the sector-wide bargaining model of Scandinavian countries. Former Labor leader Bill Shorten had flagged a shift to sector-wide bargaining, although employer groups warned that it would lead to the levels of industrial unrest of the 1970s.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, UNITED WORKERS UNION, THE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY GROUP

Wages growth Labor’s priority

Original article by Patrick Commins
The Australian – Page: 7 : 6-Dec-19

Shadow treasurer Jim Chalmers will urge the federal government to address issues such as low wages growth, underemployment and falling productivity in its mid-year economic outlook. He will tell a Chifley Research Centre conference that the economy is not working for ordinary Australians, while warning of the dangers associated with the rise of populism. Chalmers will also emphasise the need for Labor to reengage Australians in the ‘politics of progress’ in the wake of its election defeat in May.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, CHIFLEY RESEARCH CENTRE