Federal debt boss: why borrowing isn’t easy

Original article by Adam Creighton
The Australian – Page: 4 : 26-Aug-19

Australian Office of Financial Management CEO Rob Nicholl has rejected suggestions that the federal government’s capacity to increase its borrowings has been boosted by the downturn in bond yields. The yield on 10-year government bonds fell below the cash rate of one per cent earlier in August, and Nicholls argues that demand for government debt has not risen despite a global downturn in bond yields. The federal government is resisting pressure to ramp up its infrastructure spending instead of prioritising a return to a Budget surplus.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY. OFFICE OF FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

States climb $180bn debt mountain

Original article by Michael Roddan
The Australian – Page: 1 & 6 : 19-Jun-19

The combined net debt of Australia’s state and territory governments is set to exceed $184bn over the next four years, compared with just $81bn in 2018-19. Increased investment in infrastructure will be a key contributor to the debt blowout, and Robert Carling of the Centre for Independent Studies stresses the need for such projects to be subject to a cost-benefit analysis. He adds that New South Wales and Victoria could potentially be at risk of losing their AAA credit ratings if their net debt continues to rise, although he says this is unlikely in the near-term.

CORPORATES
THE CENTRE FOR INDEPENDENT STUDIES LIMITED, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, MOODY’S INVESTORS SERVICE INCORPORATED, DELOITTE ACCESS ECONOMICS PTY LTD, NEW SOUTH WALES. THE TREASURY, SOUTH AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF TREASURY AND FINANCE

$32bn debt binge funds pledges

Original article by Rebecca Urban
The Australian – Page: 6 : 28-May-19

The Victorian Government’s May 2019 Budget has forecast a surplus of $1bn in 2019-20, rising to $1.5bn in the following financial year. State debt is projected to rise by $32.1bn over the forward estimates period, topping $54.9bn in 2022-23. The increased debt will be used to finance infrastructure projects, with expenditure on infrastructure to average $13.4bn a year over the forward estimates. Meanwhile, the government has scaled back its forecasts for growth in employment and gross state product over the next three years.

CORPORATES
VICTORIA. DEPT OF TREASURY AND FINANCE, MOODY’S INVESTORS SERVICE INCORPORATED, S&P GLOBAL RATINGS

Coalition defuses debt bomb

Original article by Simon Benson
The Australian – Page: 1 & 2 : 2-Apr-19

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has rejected suggestions that the April 2019 Budget will be a ‘cash splash’ ahead of the federal election, stressing the government’s track record for fiscal discipline. Meanwhile, the Budget papers are forecast to show that Australia’s net debt will be reduced to zero by 2028-29 under the Coalition, compared with $370bn at present. The Budget is expected to remain in deficit for 2018-19, although it is likely to be lower than the $5.2bn that was forecast in the mid-year update. The government is tipped to bring forward the second and third stages of its tax cuts package.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FINANCE, AUSTRALIA. PARLIAMENTARY BUDGET OFFICE, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. FUTURE FUND MANAGEMENT AGENCY, AUSTRALIAN FEDERAL POLICE, AUSTRALIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE ORGANISATION

PM pledges more jobs, no debt

Original article by Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 4 : 29-Jan-19

Prime Minister Scott Morrison will use a speech in Brisbane on 29 January to commit the Coalition to creating an additional 1.25 million jobs over five years if it wins the 2019 federal election. He will note that the Coalition has created more than 1.2 million jobs since it won the 2013 election. Morrison will also indicate that his government will aim to clear Australia’s net debt within a decade. It currently stands at $351.9bn, or 18.2 per cent of GDP. The mid-year Budget update had forecast that net debt will fall to 1.5 per cent of GDP in 2028-29.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA

Debt to double to $60 billion as Labor drops cap

Original article by Patrick Durkin
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 9 : 23-Nov-18

The Victorian Government’s election costings show that the state’s debt ceiling will blow out to 12 per cent of gross state product as a result of its infrastructure spending program, which will be partially funded via debt. Treasurer Tim Pallas had previously sought to cap state debt at around $30bn, or less than six per cent of gross state product. Labor has also advised that the state’s Budget surplus for 2019-20 is projected to be $1.7bn, compared with expectations of a $2.3bn surplus in 2018-19. The Coalition intends to retain the existing debt ceiling and will seek to reduce the state’s debt by $1.1bn over four years if it wins the state election.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF VICTORIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, VICTORIA. DEPT OF TREASURY AND FINANCE, MELBOURNE WATER CORPORATION

Treasury warns on Australia’s debt

Original article by John Kehoe
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 9 : 20-Nov-18

The federal government’s net debt was $342bn at the end of 2017-18, which equates to 18.6 per cent of GDP. Although this is relatively low compared with many nations, Treasury secretary Philip Gaetjens says debt needs to be reduced to ensure that Australia is prepared for potential economic shocks in the future. He notes that Australia’s healthy fiscal position in 2007 helped the economy to ride out the global financial crisis. Gaetjens has also expressed concern about a blowout in global debt in the wake of the GFC.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY

$1 trillion debt bomb buried in budget papers

Original article by Adam Creighton
The Australian – Page: 1 & 6 : 21-Jun-18

Analysis of budget documents shows that the net financial liabilities of Australia’s federal, state and territory governments will top $A944bn in June 2021, which is equivalent to about $A36,000 per person. Infrastructure projects will be a major contributor to the debt blowout, with New South Wales and Victoria unveiling plans to ramp up spending on infrastructure over the next four years. Meanwhile, credit ratings agency Moody’s has expressed concern about the NSW government’s increased debt in its 2018 Budget, warning that it could affect the state’s credit profile.

CORPORATES
MOODY’S INVESTORS SERVICE INCORPORATED, NEW SOUTH WALES. THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF INFRASTRUCTURE AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT, INFRASTRUCTURE PARTNERSHIPS AUSTRALIA, QUEENSLAND. TREASURY

Surplus built on coal and more tax

Original article by Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 4 : 13-Jun-18

The Queensland Government’s June 2018 Budget includes a surplus of $A1.5bn for 2017-18 and just $A148m in 2018-19. The government has also committed to spending $A11.6bn on infrastructure projects in 2018-19 and $A45.8bn over four years. This will contribute to a blowout in the state’s debt to $A83.1bn over the next four years. Revenue from coal royalties have topped $A3.77bn in 2017-18, after coal prices were higher than expected. The government will also raise an additional $A1.8bn via five new taxes over the next four years.

CORPORATES
QUEENSLAND. TREASURY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, ADANI MINING PTY LTD, MOODY’S INVESTORS SERVICE INCORPORATED, STANDARD AND POOR’S FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC, LIBERAL-NATIONAL PARTY OF QUEENSLAND

Almost back in black as $126bn sliced off debt

Original article by Adam Creighton
The Australian – Page: 1 & 6 : 9-May-18

The Federal Government has forecast a modest Budget surplus of $A2.2bn in 2019-20. The Budget had previously been expected to return to surplus in 2020-21, compared with a likely deficit of $A18.2bn in 2017-18. Meanwhile, Australia’s gross debt is now slated to be $A558bn in 2027-28, compared with expectations of $A684bn in the mid-year Budget update in December. Net debt is expected to fall to 3.8 per cent of GDP by 2029, down from a peak of 18.6 per cent in 2017-18.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, STANDARD AND POOR’S FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC