Taylor buys off NSW with big energy deal

Original article by Angela Macdonald-Smith, Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 11 : 22-Nov-19

The New South Wales government has backed a proposal by federal Energy Minister Angus Taylor to pursue bilateral negotiate bilateral energy and climate policy agreements with each state. NSW Energy Minister Matt Kean had previously advocated an integrated national policy on climate and energy policy, as well as the revival of the shelved National Energy Guarantee. Details of a bilateral deal between the two governments is expected to be disclosed within weeks, and Kean says the deal will be much better for the state than the NEG.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPT OF PLANNING AND ENVIRONMENT, COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENTS, QUEENSLAND. DEPT OF NATURAL RESOURCES, MINES AND ENERGY, VICTORIA. DEPT OF ENVIRONMENT, LAND, WATER AND PLANNING

Energy fix could isolate Victoria

Original article by Mark Ludlow, Angela Macdonald-Smith
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 6 : 18-Nov-19

Federal Energy Minister Angus Taylor will shortly meet with his state and territory counterparts at the Council of Australian Governments energy council meeting. He will use a speech in Sydney on 18 November to outline his plans to negotiate a bilateral energy and climate policy agreement with each state, based on its unique circumstances. However, Taylor has warned that he will only strike deals with states that are ‘collaborative’. Energy Security Board chair Kerry Schott is supportive of state-based deals, provided they do not undermine existing national electricity rules.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENTS, AUSTRALIA. ENERGY SECURITY BOARD, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY MARKET OPERATOR LIMITED

Call to include clean coal in PM power push

Original article by Olivia Caisley, Joe Kelly
The Australian – Page: 5 : 31-Oct-19

Shine Energy CEO Ashley Dodd says the Clean Energy Finance Corporation’s mandate should be expanded to include replacing Australia’s existing coal-fired power plants with high-efficiency, low-emissions plants. The federal government will inject an additional $1bn into the CEFC, but it has specifically ruled out using the extra funding to invest in new coal-fired plants or to upgrade existing plants. National Party MP Keith Pitt supports expanding the CEFC’s mandate to embrace all energy sources.

CORPORATES
SHINE ENERGY, AUSTRALIA. CLEAN ENERGY FINANCE CORPORATION, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN CONSERVATION FOUNDATION INCORPORATED, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

PM’s $1bn clean energy bet

Original article by Geoff Chambers
The Australian – Page: 1 & 4 : 30-Oct-19

The federal government will establish a Grid Reliability Fund, which will be administered by the Clean Energy Finance ­Corporation. The new fund will invest in projects that increase the reliability of energy supplies and transmission infrastructure, and help to reduce electricity prices. Such projects include the ones that are on the short-list for the Underwriting New Generation Investments scheme. The government will also inject an additional $1bn into the CEFC.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, AUSTRALIA. CLEAN ENERGY FINANCE CORPORATION, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF FINANCE, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, TRANSGRID, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY REGULATOR, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY MARKET COMMISSION

Don’t extend coal power plants: Origin

Original article by Perry Williams
The Australian – Page: 17 & 26 : 25-Oct-19

Frank Calabria will use a speech to a Committee for Economic Development of Australia lunch in Sydney on 25 October to warn against extending the life of coal power plants without the government providing a ‘carbon signal’. Calabria, who is the CEO of Origin Energy, will also call for an end to the ongoing energy war. He will say that the government needs to put an end to ‘quick fixes’ so far as the energy policy ‘puzzle’ is concerned, and focus instead on long-term solutions.

CORPORATES
ORIGIN ENERGY LIMITED – ASX ORG, AGL ENERGY LIMITED – ASX AGL, COMMITTEE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIA

CEOs say big stick unlikely to be deployed

Original article by Angela Macdonald-Smith, Robert Guy
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 5 : 17-Oct-19

Alinta CEO Jeff Dimery says the federal government’s legislation to force energy companies to divest assets will probably never be triggered. Dimery argues that conditions in the energy market would have to be dire for the ‘big stick’ legislation to be used. Origin Energy CEO Frank Calabria has in turn questioned whether the legislation will increase energy affordability and reliability, while Energy Security Board chair Kerry Schott has doubts about the effectiveness of the government’s Underwriting New Generation scheme.

CORPORATES
ALINTA ENERGY (AUSTRALIA) PTY LTD, ORIGIN ENERGY LIMITED – ASX ORG, AUSTRALIA. ENERGY SECURITY BOARD

Coalition win as ALP backs big stick laws on energy

Original article by Rosie Lewis
The Australian – Page: 4 : 16-Oct-19

Labor has agreed to support the federal government’s bill to force energy companies to divest assets if they fail to reduce electricity prices. However, Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese says the policy shift is not a backdown, as the proposed legislation has been changed significantly since it was rejected by the previous parliament. The government has agreed to some concessions sought by Labor in return for supporting the bill.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY, AUSTRALIAN COMPETITION AND CONSUMER COMMISSION, FEDERAL COURT OF AUSTRALIA

Low-carbon future will arrive within a decade: APRA exec

Original article by Joanna Mather
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 6 : 15-Oct-19

Australian Prudential Regulation Authority executive board member Geoff Summerhayes says the transition to low-carbon energy will occur more quickly than has been forecast, most likely by 2030. Summerhayes has told a conference organised by the Investor Group on Climate Change that there needs to be more honest discussions about the ‘existential nature’ of climate change, and that the transition to a low-carbon future will have impacts that will not be equal across the Australian economy.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN PRUDENTIAL REGULATION AUTHORITY, INVESTOR GROUP ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Older coal-fired power stations are better bet

Original article by Simon Evans
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 11 : 11-Oct-19

Trevor St Baker contends that there is no ‘natural life’ for a coal-fired power station. St Baker, who was speaking at a national energy summit on 10 November, is the co-owner of the coal-fired Vale power station in New South Wales; he says keeping such stations operating for longer is better than taking a gamble on new technologies such as high-efficiency low emissions plants or carbon capture and storage. Tony Wood from the Grattan Institute told the summit that coal-fired power stations should be allowed to reach the end of their natural life.

CORPORATES
GRATTAN INSTITUTE, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY COUNCIL

Big energy: big-stick rules hamper firm investment

Original article by Angela Macdonald-Smith, Simon Evans, Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: S1 & S2 : 10-Oct-19

Origin Energy CEO Frank Calabria has told an energy summit that the federal government’s proposed legislation to force energy companies to divest assets is deterring investment in the sector at a time when it is urgently needed. The issue of government intervention in the energy market attracted criticism from some of the summit’s delegates, but Energy Minister Angus Taylor says such action is justified given the rise in electricity prices in recent years as renewable energy generation has increased.

CORPORATES
ORIGIN ENERGY LIMITED – ASX ORG, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, ENERGYAUSTRALIA PTY LTD, AGL ENERGY LIMITED – ASX AGL, AUSTRALIA. ENERGY SECURITY BOARD, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY MARKET OPERATOR LIMITED