Greens playing with fire

Original article by Greg Brown, Andrew Clennell, Craig Johnstone, Olivia Caisley, Ean Higgins
The Australian – Page: 1 & 6 : 12-Nov-19

Greens leader Richard Di Natale has attracted criticism for attempting to link the bushfires in New South Wales and Queensland to the major political parties’ climate change polices. National Party leader Michael McCormack has labelled the comments as disgraceful and disgusting, while shadow agriculture minister Joel Fitzgibbon has accused the Greens of hypocrisy given that they opposed Labor’s carbon pollution reduction scheme. Meanwhile, NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro says the state’s National Parks Service should have undertaken more backburning before the bushfire season commenced.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN GREENS, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, NEW SOUTH WALES. DEPT OF PREMIER AND CABINET, NEW SOUTH WALES. NATIONAL PARKS AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG, NEW SOUTH WALES RURAL FIRE SERVICE, SHINE ENERGY

BHP backs government over Kyoto loophole

Original article by James Fernyhough
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 20 : 24-Sep-19

BHP CEO Andrew Mackenzie is said to have expressed support for the Coalition’s proposal to use Kyoto carryover credits to meet Australia’s carbon emissions reduction targets under the Paris agreement. Sources have confirmed that Mackenzie did so in a private call with institutional investors on 20 September, although a BHP spokesman has declined to comment. The Minerals Council of Australia and the Business Council of Australia also support the use of carryover credits. Mackenzie had advocated greater action to address climate change earlier in 2019.

CORPORATES
BHP GROUP LIMITED – ASX BHP, MINERALS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA, BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA, THE AUSTRALIAN CENTRE FOR CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY, VISION SUPER PTY LTD, INVESTOR GROUP ON CLIMATE CHANGE, UNITED NATIONS

Energy policy, IR changes urgent

Original article by Richard Ferguson
The Australian – Page: 7 : 26-Jul-19

Australian Industry Group CEO Innes Willox has backed comments by top bureaucrat Martin Parkinson on the nation’s declining productivity rate. Willox says that uncertainty regarding energy and carbon emissions policy has contributed to Australia’s underperformance in terms of productivity growth, and he has urged action on these issues. Australian Chamber of Commerce & Industry CEO James Pearson has in turn stressed the need for industrial relations reforms in order to lift productivity. Parkinson will shortly retire as the head of the Department of the Prime Minister & Cabinet.

CORPORATES
THE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY GROUP, AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, ACTU

Energy experts urge Coalition to do more on climate policy

Original article by Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 6 : 28-May-19

RepuTex director Hugh Grossman says the Coalition’s Emissions Reduction Fund will not help Australia to achieve its 2030 carbon emissions reduction targets by itself. The fund, which has been renamed the Climate Solutions Fund, pays polluters for securing carbon abatement. However, it has been criticised for not penalising the biggest polluters and compelling them to change their behaviour. The Grattan Institute’s Tony Wood says the energy sector can be expected to adopt a more conciliatory approach to the Coalition, given that it was widely expected to lose the federal election.

CORPORATES
GRATTAN INSTITUTE, ORIGIN ENERGY LIMITED – ASX ORG, ENERGY USERS ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, REPUTEX AUSTRALIA PACIFIC PTY LTD

Morrison defends his climate policy as cost free

Original article by Simon Evans, Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 5 : 3-May-19

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the Coalition can achieve its carbon emissions reduction target without hurting the economy. Morrison contends that this is because the cost of doing so will be borne by taxpayers. His claims are at odds with modelling undertaken by economist Brian Fisher, who says the Coalition’s climate policy will impose some cost on the economy, although not as much as Labor’s policy. Labor’s climate spokesman Mark Butler claims that Fisher’s assumptions are grossly flawed.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, CITIGROUP PTY LTD, SANTOS LIMITED – ASX STO, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Price carbon cuts? Yes you can

Original article by Simon Benson
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 4 : 2-May-19

Independent modelling has concluded that GDP growth could be reduced by a cumulative $264bn by 2030 if Labor’s carbon emissions reduction policy includes unlimited access to international carbon credits. This could rise to around $1.2bn if the use of foreign carbon credits is restricted or banned. The modelling is outlined in a new report by former bureaucrat Brian Fisher, which will be released on 2 May. Labor’s climate change spokesman Mark Butler has previously argued that its emissions reduction policy cannot be costed.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND SCIENCES, INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE, AUSTRALIAN GREENS

Climate policy impossible to cost: ALP

Original article by Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 5 : 1-May-19

Labor’s climate change spokesman Mark Butler says it cannot estimate how much its carbon emissions reduction policy will cost the business sector. He argues that this is because Labor will not impose a direct carbon price on businesses. However, the Coalition claims that Labor’s policy would cost businesses between $27.5bn and $35bn. A senior industry economist argues that the lack of detail regarding Labor’s policy means that no accurate estimate of its cost can be made prior to the election.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET

Revealed: Bill’s carbon costs

Original article by Simon Benson, Ben Packham
The Australian – Page: 1 & 4 : 18-Apr-19

The Greens believe that Labor’s greenhouse gas emissions reduction target is too dependent on the use of international carbon credits. Greens MP Adam Bandt has signalled that the party could use its numbers in the Senate to block any legislation that mandates the use of international carbon credits. Meanwhile, some estimates suggest that Australian businesses could be forced to pay up to $25bn to purchase international carbon credits under Labor. This is based on an average price of $50 per carbon credit over the next decade.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN GREENS, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, INTERGOVERNMENTAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE, BAECONOMICS PTY LTD, AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

ALP plan reignites carbon wars

Original article by Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 6 : 2-Apr-19

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has criticised Labor’s proposed baseline and credit scheme, describing it as a "massive tax on jobs" that will force affected companies to spend $35bn to buy offshore carbon credits. However, the Greens argue that the scheme does not go far enough, and it should cover a broader range of industries. Greens MP Adam Bandt adds that allowing the use of international carbon permits will delay Australia’s transition to 100 per cent renewable energy. Morrison has also criticised Labor’s 2030 target for electric vehicles to comprise 50 per cent of new cars that are sold in Australia.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN GREENS, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE ENVIRONMENT AND ENERGY, THE AUSTRALIAN INDUSTRY GROUP, BUSINESS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA, MINERALS COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA

ALP’s emissions trading scheme

Original article by Phillip Coorey
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 1 & 4 : 1-Apr-19

Labor will released details of its climate change policy on 1 April. Amongst other things, Labor will introduce a new carbon emissions cap, which will be known as a baseline and credit scheme. It will initially apply to about 250 businesses whose carbon emissions are 25,000 tonnes a year. Labor will also seek to address the issue of vehicle emissions by mandating that electric vehicles must account for 50 per cent of all new cars that are sold by 2030.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY