Deadly cancer genes found

Original article by Andrew Koubaridis
Herald Sun – Page: 3 : 12-Oct-20

Researchers from Monash University and the Cancer Council Victoria have used genetic sequencing to identify three genes that are linked to aggressive forms of prostate cancer. The research found that genetic alterations in three key genes are linked to men who have a strong family history of the cancer, which kills about 60 Australian men each week. Dr Tu Nguyen-Dumont of the Monash School of Clinical Sciences says that identifying men who are more likely to develop the aggressive form of prostate cancer will in turn enable those who require urgent treatment to be identified.

CORPORATES
MONASH UNIVERSITY, THE CANCER COUNCIL VICTORIA

The cancer treatment that caught Milken’s eye in Melbourne

Original article by Jill Margo
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 2 : 11-Jun-20

The Prostate Theranostics & Imaging Centre of Excellence at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre will be officially opened on 11 June. It is headed by Michael Hofman, a pioneer in the use of theranostics to treat prostate cancer. Research undertake at 11 cancer centres across Australia has shown that theranostics has higher response rates and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. The new cancer centre has received $7.4m in funding from a foundation established by US philanthropist, convicted insider trader and prostate cancer survivor Mike Milken.

CORPORATES
PETER MACCALLUM CANCER CENTRE

New advice on prostate tests

Original article by Cathy O’Leary
The West Australian – Page: 13 : 5-Dec-14

It is estimated that about 22,000 men in Australia are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year. Around 20 per cent of men in the 45-74 age group undergo a prostate specific antigen test each year, but guidelines released by an expert advisory panel on 4 December 2014 suggest that these tests be restricted to the 50+ age group. There are doubts about the effectiveness of this test, and some experts are concerned that it can cause medical complications

CORPORATES
CANCER COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA

Aboriginal men face higher risk of dying with prostate cancer

Original article by Amy Corderoy
The Sydney Morning Herald – Page: 16 : 13-Nov-14

A new study has been published in the "British Journal of Urology International" that compares the survival rates of prostate cancer patients from Aboriginal backgrounds with those for the non-indigenous population in Australia. The former are close to 50% more likely to die of the disease, to a large extent because some 20% of this group do not have access to early treatment. The mortality rate for Aborigines with prostate cancer is 17.5%, as opposed to 11.4% for other men

CORPORATES
CANCER COUNCIL OF NEW SOUTH WALES