Australia’s jobless benefits will be among worst in OECD after Covid supplement cut

Original article by Luke Henriques-Gomes
The Guardian – Page: Online : 8-Sep-20

The federal government will reduce the COVID-19 supplement by $300 a fortnight on 25 September. Analysis conducted by Professor Peter Whitford from the Australian National University contends a low-paid worker who has lost their job during the pandemic will receive the third lowest unemployment benefit in the OECD when the supplement is reduced. Whitford uses what is known as the ‘replacement rate’ in his analysis; it compares unemployment and housing benefits with the wage a person was earning in their last job.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY, ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT

Productivity Commission Workplace reform conclusions softened by reliance on inaccurate employment data

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: online : 17-Aug-15

The Productivity Commission Workplace Relations Framework draft report released on August 4, 2015 is an important milestone for Australia and has the right ideas – however, there are also several things missing from the report that must be exposed and discussed. The biggest problem with the report is its reliance on the ‘politically convenient’ ABS unemployment figures that consistently under-state the real level of unemployment and under-employment in the Australian workforce and the inadequate data on the cash economy. There are two issues in relation to unemployment: the actual numbers in % terms and ‘000s of people; and the trends.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. PRODUCTIVITY COMMISSION, AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

Rising unemployment among young Aussies matched by increasing anxiety, depression and stress

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 25-May-15

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey has found that 9.5 per cent of Australians aged 18-24 were looking for work in 2010. This figure had almost doubled to 18.9 per cent by the end of 2014. Meanwhile, the proportion of 18-24 year-olds who reported experiencing anxiety in an average 12 months has risen from 11.2 per cent to 23 per cent over the last five years, which is the highest incidence of any age group and well above the national average of 16.6 per cent. The survey also shows that proportion of 18-24 year-olds affected by stress has grown from 24 per cent to 33.7 per cent, while the incidence of depression has increased from 11.3 per cent to 19.4 per cent.

CORPORATES
ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED