Parties urge shorter pre-polling time

Original article by Geoff Chambers
The Australian – Page: 6 : 24-Oct-19

The issue of early voting in federal elections came under scrutiny by the joint standing committee on electoral matters on 23 October. Andrew Hirst, the Liberal Party’s federal director, told the committee’s inquiry into the 18 May election that the pre-polling period should be reduced from three weeks to two, while the number of pre-polling centres should be reduced to 2013 levels. He argued that pre-polling means that many people have voted before political parties have released their key election policies.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. JOINT STANDING COMMITTEE ON ELECTORAL MATTERS, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL COMMISSION, GETUP LIMITED

Quiet Australians shifted votes because of Shorten, not Morrison

Original article by Andrew Tillett
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 6 : 3-Sep-19

Research undertaken by the Australian National University shows that 28.5 per cent of electors switched their voting intentions during the federal election campaign. The analysis of voters’ behaviour also shows that 39.6 per cent of electors who had intended to vote for Labor when the election was called in April subsequently voted for the Coalition on 18 May. Likewise, 37.2 per cent of electors who had expressed their intention to vote for the Coalition ended up giving Labor their vote. The research has concluded that the unpopularity of former Labor leader Bill Shorten was a key factor in the election outcome, rather than Labor’s policies or the personal appeal of Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

Unions try to fathom loss of workers’ vote

Original article by David Marin-Guzman
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 6 : 21-May-19

Analysis of voting at the federal election indicates that the labour movement needs to do a better job of communicating with working-class voters, following Labor’s shock loss. BCG Gamma has found that electorates with households with a median weekly income of more than $1,800 preferred to vote for Labor rather than the Coalition, as were electorates where more voters had a higher education. Union leaders suggest that working-class voters steered away from Labor over a range of issues, including its proposed changes to negative gearing and its mixed messages on the Adani coal mine. The ACTU is tipped to review its $10 million ‘Change the Rules’ advertising campaign in the wake of the election.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, BCG GAMMA, ACTU, ELECTRICAL TRADES UNION, VICTORIAN TRADES HALL COUNCIL

AEC criticised over election security

Original article by Tom McIlroy
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 9 : 23-Jan-18

Auditor-General Grant Hehir has accused the Australian Electoral Commission of misleading voters about the level of polling security at the 2016 federal election. Hehir also found that the amount that the AEC paid contractors to transport voters’ ballot papers was higher than it had budgeted for, and that it had made a last-minute decision to manually count more than 14 million large Senate ballot papers. The AEC had spent $A27.2 million on scanning systems, but it determined that they were not accurate enough.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN ELECTORAL COMMISSION, AUSTRALIA. OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE, AUSTRALIAN SIGNALS DIRECTORATE

Labor to hold post mortem into Queensland failures

Original article by Mark Ludlow
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 5 : 13-Jul-16

At best, the Australian Labor Party is likely to win seven Queensland seats in the 2016 federal election, compared with its expectations of up to 12. The Coalition is expected to have 22 seats in Queensland, despite a 2.5 per cent swing against it. Labor’s disappointing performance in Queensland will be closely scrutinised as part of a broader review of its election campaign.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, ONE NATION PARTY

Serious money on Coalition: bookies

Original article by Michael Koziol, Nicole Hasham
The Canberra Times – Page: 6 : 1-Jul-16

Bookmakers say that betting trends suggest that the Australian Government will be re-elected on 2 July 2016. The Australian Labor Party’s chances of winning have lengthened to $A7, according to Centrebet’s odds, compared with $A1.10 for the Coalition. However, experience shows that the odds are not always a reliable guide. Labor won the 2015 election in Queensland despite punters backing the Coalition, while the odds suggested that Britons would vote to remain in the European Union.

CORPORATES
CENTREBET INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, LIBERAL-NATIONAL PARTY OF QUEENSLAND, SPORTSBET AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, FAIRFAX MEDIA LIMITED – ASX FXJ, IPSOS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

Homosexuality is immoral, say almost 3 in 10 Coalition voters

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 30-Jun-16

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey has found that 21 per cent of Australian voters agree with the statement that "homosexuality is immoral". The survey, which has been carried out since the last federal election in September 2013, also shows that 28 per cent of Liberal Party voters and 32 per cent of National Party voters (or 28 per cent of Coalition voters overall) believe that homosexuality is immoral. This compares with 15 per cent of ALP voters and four per cent of Greens voters, while 31 per cent of Independent/Other voters agree with the statement. Eight of the top 10 electorates in which voters are most likely to believe that homosexuality is immoral are held by the Coalition.

CORPORATES
ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN GREENS

Labor preferences agreement splits conservatives

Original article by David Crowe
The Australian – Page: 6 : 23-Jun-16

The Liberal Democratic Party has secured a preferences deal with the Australian Labor Party in a number of marginal seats that are currently held by the Coalition. The LDP’s Senator David Leyonhjelm says the Liberal Party has not directed preferences to him, despite the fact that he voted with the Coalition more than any other crossbencher during the last Parliament. Meanwhile, the Family First Party is directing its preferences to the Coalition in all of the seats in which it has a candidate.

CORPORATES
LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, FAMILY FIRST PARTY AUSTRALIA LIMITED, NICK XENOPHON TEAM, CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC PARTY, SHOOTERS, FISHERS AND FARMERS PARTY

Labor and Greens swap deal ‘a danger’

Original article by David Crowe
The Australian – Page: 9 : 14-Jun-16

The Australian Labor Party and the Greens have secured a deal to swap preference votes in many electorates. However, the Greens have excluded 11 electorates from the preferences deal, and the party will direct first preferences to minor parties in the Senate. Labor and the Greens will also have an open ticket in South Australia in order to avoid directing second preferences to the Nick Xenophon Team. The Coalition recently announced that it will direct its preferences to Labor.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN GREENS, NICK XENOPHON TEAM, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, ANIMAL JUSTICE PARTY, MARRIAGE EQUALITY PARTY, SECULAR PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, PIRATE PARTY AUSTRALIA, RENEWABLE ENERGY PARTY

Captain’s call ‘a bid to sink Greens’

Original article by Sid Maher, Sarah Martin
The Australian – Page: 1 & 6 : 13-Jun-16

The Federal Government will direct preferences to the Australian Labor Party, rather than smaller parties such as the Greens and the Nick Xenophon Team. Labor in turn has indicated that it will not direct preferences to Xenophon’s party in South Australian seats. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has defended the Coalition’s decision to direct preferences to its arch rival, arguing that it is in the national interest to avoid another minority government in which the Greens and minority parties have significant influence.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE PRIME MINISTER AND CABINET, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, AUSTRALIAN GREENS, NICK XENOPHON TEAM, LIBERAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA, NATIONAL PARTY OF AUSTRALIA