50 is the new 60 when defining older worker

Original article by Hannah Wootton
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 10 : 17-May-21

Seventeen per cent of business leaders now classify people aged 51-55 as ‘older’ workers, compared to just 11 per cent in 2018. This is according to a survey by the Australian Human Resources Institute and the Human Rights Commission; just under 50 per cent of those surveyed stated that they would be reluctant to hire someone over a specific age. Age Discrimination Commissioner Kay Patterson contends that businesses should be looking at the value of "multi-generational workplaces"; she notes the most important thing is the ability to do your job, rather than your chronological age.

CORPORATES
AUSTRALIAN HUMAN RESOURCES INSTITUTE, AUSTRALIAN HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION, QANTAS AIRWAYS LIMITED – ASX QAN

Age bias starts at 47, survey finds

Original article by Claire Stewart
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 9 : 10-Jul-15

It is estimated that the annual economic contribution of Australian workers over the age of 45 is about $A65bn. However, the Westpac Women of Influence Report shows that business leaders believe that workplace discrimination is becoming a problem for employees at the age of 47. The survey also shows that almost 80 per cent of respondents believe that gender-based discrimination still occurs in Australian workplaces.

CORPORATES
WESTPAC BANKING CORPORATION – ASX WBC, AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS, AUSTRALIA. SEXUAL DISCRIMINATION COMMISSION