EV rollout threat to power grid

Original article by Ben Packham
The Australian – Page: 4 : 5-Apr-19

Energy Networks Australia has used a submission to a Senate inquiry to warn that the nation’s electricity grid may not be equipped to cope with the growing use of electric vehicles. The peak energy network body argued that incentives will be necessary to encourage consumers to recharge their electric cars during off-peak periods. Labor recently announced that it will require electric vehicles to account for 50 per cent of new car sales by 2030 if it wins the upcoming federal election.

CORPORATES
ENERGY NETWORKS AUSTRALIA, AUSTRALIAN LABOR PARTY, INFRASTRUCTURE PARTNERSHIPS AUSTRALIA, COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENTS, AUSTRALIA. DEPT OF THE TREASURY

Households may have to pay more to ease power crunches

Original article by Ben Potter, Angela Macdonald-Smith
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 10 : 29-Jan-19

The Grattan Institute’s energy program director Tony Wood has cautioned against an overreaction to the recent rolling power blackouts that impacted South Australia and Victoria. Charging consumers more to use air conditioners during extreme heat has been put forward as one solution to the problem of matching demand with supply during such weather conditions, as has simplifying the regulatory test for new transmission links.

CORPORATES
GRATTAN INSTITUTE, AUSTRALIAN ENERGY MARKET OPERATOR LIMITED, TRANSGRID, SPARK INFRASTRUCTURE GROUP – ASX SKI, ENERGYAUSTRALIA PTY LTD, SCHNEIDER AUSTRALIA

‘Green’ paper smells foul to some

Original article by Lucille Keen
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 11 : 24-Sep-14

The Australian Government’s energy proposals may increase the price of power for many households. The "green" paper proposes changes in the pricing of electricity to give consumers greater control over their use of energy. Narelle Rothery of South Australia said that it would be difficult for families to move household power usage to off-peak periods

CORPORATES
GREEN INITIATIVES PTY LTD

Case for electricity tariff reform ‘clear’

Original article by Adam Creighton
The Australian – Page: 18 : 18-Jul-14

AGL Energy’s chief economist, Paul Simshauser, argues that adopting an electric power tariff system based on the time of use could boost economic activity. He estimates that productivity could potentially increase by around $A1.6bn annually. Research by AGL suggests that nearly 66 per cent of Australian households that take up time-based tariffs are financially better off. He says an opt-out system for flexible tariffs may be the best approach

CORPORATES
AGL ENERGY LIMITED – ASX AGK