Rise in vegetarianism not halting the march of obesity

Original article by Roy Morgan
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 16-Apr-19

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey shows that in the year to December 2018, nearly 2.5 million Australians (12.1% of the population) had diets of which the food is all, or almost all, vegetarian. This compares with less than 2.2 million (11.2%) in 2014. However, the rising level of vegetarianism in Australia has yet to stop the increasing trend towards obesity. Now 28.5% of Australians have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of over 30 and are classified as ‘Obese’, up 2.1% points from four years ago. Some 2.7% of Australians are classified as ‘Underweight’, up 0.2% points from four years ago. ‘Underweight’ Australians have a BMI below 18.5. Meanwhile, analysis shows that Metrotechs (18.2%) and Aspirationals (13.1%) have a higher than average share of vegetarians among Roy Morgan’s Helix Personas communities.

CORPORATES
ROY MORGAN LIMITED

Obese youth can lose eight years off their lives

Original article by Nicky Phillips
The Sydney Morning Herald – Page: 9 : 8-Dec-14

Margaret Allman-Farinelli, nutrition researcher at the University of Sydney, says new studies show that weight control programs aimed at young adults only have an effect in about half of all cases. Australians between the ages of 25 and 34 on average put on 6.7 kilograms over that period, as their activity levels drop and they start cooking their own meals. Meanwhile, new modelling conducted in Canada suggests that those overweight with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 25 to 30 face a reduction in life expectancy of three years, and those obese with a BMI between 30 and 35 one of up to eight years

CORPORATES
UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY. CHARLES PERKINS CENTRE

Weight problems linked to overdue babies and rising caesarean rate

Original article by Kate Hagan
The Age – Page: 4 : 18-Jun-14

Helena Parkington of Monash University’s School of Biomedical Sciences and Shaun Brennecke of the Royal Women’s Hospital (RWH) and University of Melbourne have published a new study in the "Nature Communications" journal. Based on uterine tissue samples from 70 RWH patients who gave birth by caesarean section, it argues that those who are overweight may be less able to go into labour. Obese women have difficulty reacting when electrical signals in the uterine muscle cells cease that prevent premature labour

CORPORATES
ROYAL WOMEN’S HOSPITAL, MONASH UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE