It’s official: golf is good for you!

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 17-Nov-16

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey has found that 9.3% of Australians aged 18+ (just over 1.7 million) play golf either regularly or occasionally, putting it among our 10 most popular forms of exercise. The survey also shows that between July 2015 and June 2016, 25.8% of Australian adults reported experiencing stress at some point in the preceding 12 months; 18.3% reported having anxiety; 15.1% had depression; and 5.4% suffered at least one panic attack. Among people who play golf, these figures fell to 22.5% for stress, 11.9% for anxiety, 8.7% for depression and 3.0% for panic attacks. The data also reveals that even watching golf on TV appears to have a positive effect on the viewer’s mental health, with golf viewers reporting below-average incidences of anxiety, depression, panic attacks and stress.

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ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED

How worsening job security impacts mental health: gradually for women but as one sharp shock for men

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 9-May-16

New data from Roy Morgan Research shows that employees who rate their job security as "very poor" are over 50 per cent more likely than those with a "very good" sense of job security to suffer anxiety, stress or depression. A study from 2013 to 2015 of over 20,000 Australians aged 14+ about their employment found that 33 per cent report suffering anxiety, stress, and/or depression within the past 12 months. Some 30 per cent of employees with "very good" or "good" job security suffered from one or more of these conditions, compared with 35 per cent of those who rated security as "fair", 41 per cent of those who rated it as "poor" and 46 per cent of employees with "very poor" job security.

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ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED

Rising unemployment among young Aussies matched by increasing anxiety, depression and stress

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 25-May-15

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey has found that 9.5 per cent of Australians aged 18-24 were looking for work in 2010. This figure had almost doubled to 18.9 per cent by the end of 2014. Meanwhile, the proportion of 18-24 year-olds who reported experiencing anxiety in an average 12 months has risen from 11.2 per cent to 23 per cent over the last five years, which is the highest incidence of any age group and well above the national average of 16.6 per cent. The survey also shows that proportion of 18-24 year-olds affected by stress has grown from 24 per cent to 33.7 per cent, while the incidence of depression has increased from 11.3 per cent to 19.4 per cent.

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ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED

Yet another reason sport is good for you!

Original article by Roy Morgan Research
Market Research Update – Page: Online : 17-Mar-15

A Roy Morgan Single Source survey has found that 1.35 million Australian adults participate regularly in some kind of team sport. The survey, which was carried out in the year to December 2014, also shows that 25% of Australians aged 18+ reported experiencing stress at some point in the preceding 12 months, compared with just 21 per cent of those who regularly play a team sport. Some 12 per cent of regular team-sport players suffered from anxiety, compared with 16 per cent of the general population. Likewise, eight per cent of those who play regular team sport suffered from depression, compared with 14 per cent of the general population

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ROY MORGAN RESEARCH LIMITED

Survey paints a dire picture

Original article by Edmund Tadros
The Australian Financial Review – Page: 33 : 20-Feb-15

A survey by the Survive Law website shows that stress is a major issue for most Australian law students. The online survey found that nearly 50 per cent of respondents had contemplated quitting their degree due to stress. Kat Crossley, the website’s editor, notes that the limited job opportunities for law graduates is also a major issue. Melbourne Law School dean Carolyn Evans adds that the challenging graduate job market is an issue for all university students

CORPORATES
SURVIVE LAW, UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE. LAW SCHOOL, COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIAN LAW DEANS, UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIAN LAW STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION